Sie sind hier

Cortona3d expands its cortona3d rapid products range

5 September, 2005

Cortona3D, a world leader in the provision of Web3D interactive solutions, today introduces a new approach to the market for its Cortona3D technology with the release of a new set of standalone products targeted at the small-scale production of 3D simulations. These new Rapid authoring tools include RapidManual for maintenance and repair functions, RapidLearning for personnel training and RapidCatalog for the distribution of spare parts.

"With this release, we would like to offer our clients a step-by-step approach in the utilization of the Cortona3D technology - from small-scale projects to server-based solutions with a powerful 3D repository and the full integration of the Cortona3D Enterprise platform into the company's PLM and ERP systems," said George Pachikov, CEO, Cortona3D.

The Cortona3D technology is an open standard solution that enables manufacturing companies to reuse existing 3D CAD and PDM data to produce Web-enabled interactive 3D simulations that can significantly enhance their maintenance, training and spare part distribution processes. These visually intuitive and highly interactive 3D simulations can help users understand complex technical procedures more easily.

The Cortona3D technology is now being more widely introduced in the aviation, aerospace and shipbuilding industries, where it has been chosen for use by leading manufacturing companies such as Boeing, the European Space Agency, the Sukhoi Aviation Corporation and Admiralty Shipyards amongst others.

"The Cortona3D technology from Cortona3D allows a manufacturer like Admiralty Shipyards to create visually intuitive maintenance documentation that can be easily adapted to local markets. This is very important for a company whose production is targeted at both the domestic and foreign markets. These new products will help us to expand the use of the Cortona3D technology and introduce it into our remote training and customer support service processes," said Sergey Shifrin, Head of Training Center, Admiralty Shipyards.